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20121205
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CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 7:45am EST
of the use of naval forces by the union and confederate armies during the civil war. now on booktv. he reports on the impact that each navy made during the war, from union naval support of numerous battles, including vicksburg and new orleans to the confederates use of naval mines and the militaristic deployment of a submarine. it's a little under an hour. >> good evening, everyone. last time we met here on this very stage to talk about the civil war, jim, you are looking to finishing touches on your new book. you are preparing your publication as well. now i have to do this the way they do it on the talk shows. now, james mcpherson "war on the waters" and craig, the civil war at sea, very handsomely done, are both out. that's good because we get to resume our -- we barely scratched the surface. let's get right to it because we spoke for an hour last time, we got to about january 1862. so i will assume you all know about 1861, and get to something that jim pointed out. that was rather interesting. is that 150 years ago this month, besides all the other things that were going on, the re
CSPAN
Dec 12, 2012 7:30am EST
. >> twenty-five years ago the u.s. and the soviet union signed a treaty which removed thousands of nuclear missiles from europe. former reagan administration officials talk about the negotiations that led to the intermediate nuclear forces treaty. at this event hosted by the american foreign service association, it's an hour 20 minutes. >> okay. i think we're ready to go. i would invite everyone to take their seats. i'd like to wish all a very good morning. i'm susan johnson, the president of afsa, and i'd like to extend a very warm afsa welcome to you all, and thank you for coming to this important and special panel discussion, and also celebration of the 25th anniversary of the signing the inf treaty. special thanks of course go to our panelists and our moderator, and i should not talk, ridgway and burt, for sharing their experiences and reflections surrounding the conflict negotiations that led to this treaty which was a significant factor in reducing danger of the cold war. i'm sure you know all of these three eminent folks, but i would just like to say a quick word. ambassador rozanne
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 4:00pm EST
to go into world war ii, when to speak with the union, and he said, look, we have realizes that if you're a does not sustain free enterprise, the united states cannot gain free enterprise itself. so if you're looking for a motive for this, that is really what it comes back to. >> is there something distinctive about the american state the positions it to do this? of the states occurred in the wind. >> you really have to understand this historically because if you ask the question of globalization being inevitable and you looked at the first half of 20th-century, it looked like it was impossible. you have empires that are fragmenting globalization. have two world wars. yet the oppression. in the question by the second world war is, is globalization at all possible? can you have a global capitol system? and it was only made possible because the american state had a specific capacity to take that on some specific capacities and the interest because you have to remember that after the first world war the u.s. was already a dominant economic power in the world by far. industrial power. alre
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2012 8:00pm EST
union over the intermediate nuclear forces treaty. they talk about the u.s. health care system and later the house transportation committee hearing on high speed rail. on tomorrow's woo journal, u.s. news and world report business correspondent rick newman on the november jobs report. and a discussion about public health in america with national institute of allergy and infect use disease directer and cbc directer thomas. washington journal begins live each morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >>> chief of staff had to make the plan for the innovation of japan without considering the atomic bomb. it was estimated that the land would cost 700 men with 250,000 -- be at the bko and 500,000 to be named. >>> as harry truman's grandson somebody in the middle. i have to -- i choose to honor both. both the sacrifice and sacrifice of american servicemen fighting their way through the pacific and i have a little girl like? who died as a result of the atomic bombing. it's unimaginable what that must have been like to be close to that to the hype center where that fire ball originated in the bla
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2012 7:00pm EST
it is -- i'm sure that millions of iranians are rushing to the west side of the european union to read the guidelines of human rights which clearly are having a great impact or thin life. one of the problems we're confronting -- it is a real problem. ali alluded to it. we are confronted with a huge dilemma. the dilemma is the following. want to stop iran from having nuclear weapons and the reason why that if you pursue a policy of support for democracy in iran at the same time, the regime will move away from negotiations and if we have to choose between depriving the regime of nuclear weapons or depriving the regime of its power inside the country, it's easier to achieve the former rather than the latter and it's better overall, that we can live with a authoritarian iran without nuclear reps and try to pursue a free iran, we might end up with a nuclear armed awer to tearan iran. so it's a dilemma but doesn't serve our purposes well. we haven't invested significantly on creating human rights tools. there's a lot of things we can do to increase our policy. and by the way, there's somethi
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 6:00pm EST
, soviet documents, documents of the former soviet union have become available to researchers. the soviets played a pivotal war in the 1967 war. they precipitated the crisis. i was able to go to moscow and access some of these documents. there's been a new opening in two of the three major arab participants in the war. in jordan and in egypt, there's a tremendous wave of publications about the war, phepl oeurs, studies, even the release of certain documents which is rare in the arab world about 1967. the only place this has not occurred is in syria. in syria, officially the war never occurred. there is not one single official book -- and all books in syria are official -- about the 1967 war. how the average syria believes israel came into possession of the golan heights is a mystery to me. >> you were born where? >> i was born in the tiny town in upstate new york but raised in new jersey. >> when did you first go to israel? >> i first went when i was 15. i went to work on a farm. i worked in alfalfa, i worked in the cows, i became a cowboy. i was a lousy farmer. i went and studied history.
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 8:00am EST
time included members of labor unions, farm groups and civil rights organizations. included representative not just of the medical profession but of the people who need it and use health care. a woman named florence greenberg traveled from chicago, illinois to washington to offer her testimony. she was a member of the women's auxiliary of the steelworkers organizing committee, spending her days working in communities around the steel mills. greenberg told the audience at the national health conference that she had come to offer them a different picture of chicago. just steps away from the comfortable headquarters of the american medical association, tenements, a 6 chicago where people struggled with terrible health conditions related to poverty and unemployment and struggled to obtain basic medical care. greenberg told the conference of the grossly overcrowded county hospital, the city's only public hospital with local describes as a death house, a single overcrowded private hospital served the entire african-american community of the south side. chicago's outpatient clinics
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 8:30am EST
which until this election was a predominantly republican-voting phenomena, and those in union city, new jersey, um, who have, you know, electorally expressed themselves via the democratic party. and a lot of that dose to who en-- goes to who engaged them when they showed up and cultivated their political activity and included them in the political activity that was going on at that time in those communities. so i think there's a lot to be said for viewing the influence of latinos in this cycle and particularly going forward as part of a broader coalition. um, and one that, you know, i've heard time and time again everybody likes, republicans love to go back to the reagan quote. the national exit polls this year shouldn't give you a lot of comfort. >> right. >> it's, you know, two-thirds support for abortion rights, 60% support for the affordable care act. um, the almost 59% support for same-sex marriage. those are, this is among hispanics in the national exit poll. that doesn't sound particularly socially conservative to me. >> no. >> so -- >> and, and also the question i think at some
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 7:00pm EST
but the problem with the european union fed is monetary union's as opposed to the fiscal union. they benefited from the low interest-rate and that meant they allow the policies to get out of line. just the reverse of the problem that we have here. we could raise rates but the discipline that would occur. >> i thought you would make a different point*. . . there in the midst of deciding if they want more or if they want less. the euro could not survive some kind of central control. more sense of discipline before the crisis than they have head which means some kind of limit on fiscal policy for one thing but it goes beyond fiscal policy. spain had a pretty good fiscal policy. they managed to get in big trouble pouring a lot of money into building houses and that had some kind of oversight of economic policy more generally as part of the price of being in a union. and they wanted to make the union -- without the economic union. it doesn't work. so, the proposals are out there and i think they basically want to move toward more economic union and the cost to do that takes a change in a lot of deb
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 3:45pm EST
in january 11, in a in a state of the union address, roosevelt spoke to the american people about the war and especially the piece the allies plan to establish after fascism. he said the one supreme object is for the future can be summed up in one word, security. that means not only physical security which provides safety from attacks by aggressors, and it's also economic security and social security. the individual political right upon which the united states had been built, was not argued, were necessary, but not sufficient to carry t. true freedom and security. fdr announced an economic liberates, which is sometimes called the second bill of rights. it included the right to a job and a living wage, direct housing, education and security in old age and their right to adequate medical care in the opportunity to achieve and enjoy good health. so we cannot fdr mishearing florence greenberg speech, we here at kos and his second bill of rights. the idea of economic and social rights is an essential supplement to political right started as far back as the french revolution. the idea of a righ
CSPAN
Dec 12, 2012 7:00am EST
democratic legitimacy within the european union. when we are discussing banking union, it's at this house that we should account, when we're discussing the union budget it is this house the represent our taxpayers that we should account. and i always bear that in mind when i'm negotiating as it will be tomorrow at the european council. >> can the prime minister confirm the autumn statement reveals the government is now borrowing 212 billion pounds more than it previously planned? >> well, i wouldn't take this from the honorable lady if her plans were to borrow even more. the point is, i know that the party opposite was desperately disappointed that the office for budget responsibility predicted that borrowing would come down this year as well as last year. but that is the fact. >> the prime minister has rightly said that we are locked in a global economic raise. does he share my concern that having the highest aviation taxes in the world makes it harder for businesses to compete, and increases the cost of living? will he ask the treasure to conduct a thorough review of whether this tax co
CSPAN
Dec 11, 2012 12:00pm EST
for insured depository institution and the ncua for credit unions provides unlimited insurance for noninterest-bearing accounts at banks and credit unions. these transaction accounts are used by businesses, local governments, hospitals, and other nonprofit organizations for payroll and other recurrent expenses. and this program provides certainty to businesses in uncertain times. these accounts are also important to our nation's smallest financial institutions. in fact, 90% of community banks with assets under $10 billion have tag deposits. this program allows these institutions to serve the banking needs of the small businesses in their communities, keeping deposits local. in my state of south dakota, i know that the tag program is important to banks, credit unions, and small businesses. our nation's economy is certainly in a different place than it was in 2008 at the height of the financial crisis when this program was created. but with concerns about the fiscal cliff and continued instability in european markets, i believe a temporary extension is needed. therefore, i believe a clean two-ye
CSPAN
Dec 5, 2012 5:00pm EST
of its people. the soviet union began to relax its restrictions on jewish emigration in 1987 during gorbachev's perestroika. then following the collapse of the soviet union in 1991, millions of soviet jews were permitted to leave. since then, russia has allowed free emigration. i have felt for a long time that we should have graduated russia from jackson-vanik when jackson-vanik's noble purpose was achieved rather than waiting years, often in the effort to make other points relative to russia on other issues. first some history. in 2007, i met with rabbi lazar, chief rabbi of russia regarding jackson-vanik. he urged passage of legislation ending the application of jackson-vanik to russia. also in 2007, i received a letter from the chairman of the federation of jewish communities which represents presidents and rabbis of over 200 jewish communities in russia, a letter which urged me to work to graduate russia from the jackson-vanik amendment in view of the fact that its goals had already been met. part of his letter reads as follows -- quote -- "we're thankful for all your efforts to
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 12:00pm EST
process, play? as the soviet union teetered toward an end to? >> i am not sure it had that much direct effect. i would say that ending the arms race, because this was the beginning of ending the arms race and you know it really took the s.t.a.r.t. treaty and a series of others to do so, and it took the liberation of eastern europe and, which went as a separate process. but, i would say that these things actually freed up gorbachev to try to reform the system. it took the pressure off of him. as long as we had the arms race, they had an excuse not for changing the system, but once you and the cold war, not just the arms race, and gorbachev ended it ideologically december 7, 1988, today is also an anniversary of that -- exactly a year after he signed the inf treaty, what he ended in that speech aside from announcing unilateral reductions in their military, was he discarded the class struggle as the rationale for soviet foreign-policy. that was the rationale that also cut the khan eunice party as the dictatorship in the country. so the end of the cold war reforms that gorbachev started th
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2012 11:00pm EST
and the soviet union is gone. today i don't mind giving money to communists and leftists and socialists and hoping none because i'm not worried about the return of the cold war. i'm not worried about leftists coming to power. my god, that should be the biggest challenge we face. we should not be indifferent to the outcome in egypt in countries across the middle east. we can both play a role in ensuring a level playing field in assisting those who we have an outcome in their success. we can do both. they are not antithetical and that should be what our agenda is in this country. >> okay, a few add-on comments. >> i would agree with a lot of what rob said. i basically believe in almost everybody's business and i certainly believe in unleashing the agency, even though it doesn't want to be unleashed to support covertly because i think i don't think anybody will openly take our money, but covertly supporting liberals and the motley crew that rob mentioned. great, i'm all for it. there was much cash as you can find that we can get out of washington, give it to them, hope they organize, hope
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 6:30am EST
, david carrier, national association of federal credit unions. i'm curious who you feel should be securitizing mortgages, and if you feel it's the banks, why should we trust them after what just happened? i'd like to hear from each of you, actually, on that one. thank you. >> do you want me to start on that? >> were you trying to direct that to somebody in particular? >> all three. >> all right, bob, we'll give you first crack, and we'll keep our other comments brief, however. >> i would say it doesn't matter so much who does the securitization. i think i would be in favor of trying a rule where loans going into securitization have to meet certain common sense standards. other loans that don't meet those standards could be made, but they would have to be kept by the lender. the securitizer could be a sort of public utility, or it could be opened up to any firm that wanted to go into that business. i think there's going to be huge debate over what structure makes sense, and i think it's going to be very difficult for congress to decide what is the right formula. >> i think i con
CSPAN
Dec 11, 2012 8:00pm EST
of the special u.s. envoy and african union envoy. the purpose should be clear to present international stakeholders towards a unified policy to address all aspects of this regional crisis. also what did she miss a second letter to be sent to president obama and secretary clinton signed the organizations including africa faith and justice that were, global witness, open society foundations, refugees and among many others. point for special envoys, global leadership to engage constructively in the political process. thank you and a look for today's testimony. >> and the other panelists? >> thank you, mr. chairman. i would like to raise a point. throughout the conflict the mines remain open. minerals, gems, rare earths provides financing for the conflict. it's a motivation for a great deal of it. who's buying this material and what do we know about the chain of dollars in material on an international basis? is there anything we or the u.n. or the african union are doing to choke this off? >> i now introduce or witnessed in the u.s. department of state of state, ambassador johnnie carson s
CSPAN
Dec 5, 2012 12:00pm EST
being organized by eco was, the economic community of west african states, and the african union. in the weeks ahead, the u.n. security council will likely vote on a resolution authorizing this coalition to lead a military intervention to dislodge the terrorists in the northern. we've seen models like this wo work, in cote d'ivoire and somalia, so there's reason to believe in the potential of a regional military solution to the security crisis in the north. however, even if this intervention works, it will take time to train and equip and assemble the regional force and to develop the appropriate plans for what happens during and after a military intervention. and, frankly, mr. president, security and stability can't be restored to mali with military action alone. the current crisis is as much about governance as it is about security. a stronger m stronger malian des the best way to ensure short gains in the short-term and long-term. but democracy doesn't just begin and end with an election. one of the reasons that mali democracy crumbled so quickly is that malians did not feel c
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 11:00pm EST
of union members who like to be there and on the republican side there's a lot of overzellous supporters on our side. i think that alone brings different dimensions to voting locations. not eave state or every polling location but definitely something we hear voters say i don't feel comfortable walking past or walking in or whatever that is, and that shouldn't be the case for anybody. i don't think it's -- it's not a massive problem. not in the double digit percentages. but nieminen feels -- anytime anyone feels intimidate, that's wrong. >> i know we're going to go back and forth on the -- one step that comes back to me is there's roughly -- closed the books in florida but roughly 300,000 more voters this time than in 2008. 6200 precincts, 5300 polling locations. clearly less early vote day. but even these polling locations -- they're not jam packed 12 hours a day. i do agree that the lines are longer. i just don't necessarily think that it was because of regulations or because of someone trying to nefariously suppress the vote. i think it was literalie just underprepared officials and n
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2012 11:00pm EST
the soviet union than the tone he took in the first three years not to have in mind that politics might have sent in to do with it. but heavens, the media is so skeptical. minute, minute, minute. >> a minute on the meaning of the impact of inf. >> the principal lesson learned in looking at some of the things we talked about here today as you must know the total range of your interest in you must be prepared to serve all of them equally well and not allow yourself to get tangled up in setting conditions that no one can meet unless it is your active to avoid negotiations. if you want negotiations, you must make it possible for your negotiating partner to get to the table. >> thank you rain much. >> the one that i would take away is the importance, number one, of eliminating weapons you want rather than putting a limit on them in verifying that. it's much easier to verify this year than any concrete number. and therefore, i think we really have to get our minds off we putting women on types of arms, they trying to get rid of those we don't want. we are facing now a possible theory of stearate u
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2012 5:00pm EST
of the soviet union and its intentions. president truman and his staff and glued together the containment strategy that stayed in effect through general eisenhower's presidency and leader until bill wall berlin came tumbling down and the soviet union imploded on itself. the strategy worked. as we get this is important that we put together a national strategy. there's not one single threat out there but many terrorism, force, state against state challenges, and that's what we must do. and we must nurture those in the war colleges in the state department that have their strategic vision of the ability to glue together a good strategy and make sure that it does come to pass. so, i and hopeful we can solve the problem with the the congress can come together as we did in many of the tough choices, and if you watch the comedians from time to time, you will see larry the cable guide, and let me take a phrase from him to the congress. get er done. [applause] >> remember getting a graduation speech one day walking down the aisle and they put a little note in my hand. so i read it during the invoca
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 12:00pm EST
, franklin's banalny planned the union. and so it went through the years. one of the great politicians of all time in this city was the may i don't have of albany. he had great success from the time he was elected in 1942 until he died in the hospital of emphysema in 1983. eleven terms, uninterrupted. and he -- that's the longest-running mayor of any si city in the united states. and he was very proud of that achievement. he was part of this fantastic political machine which took power away from the republicans in 1921. and the key figure in that was an irishman, dan o'connell. there was four o'connell brothers, and there were a couple of corning brothers. they founded the new democratic party, and they took the city back from the republicans that had run it since 1899. and when they took it in 1921, they never let go. it's still in power. the succession has been on through the deaths of the two people who were the key perpetuators of the machine. dan o'connell died in 1977 and his son ten years later, and after that came tommy wales who was chosen as successor, and now jerry jennings succeed
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 5:00pm EST
it or not the day before he left it out of message from the union station in baltimore saying they had a package for us. we wound down to get it. it was a cocker spaniel dog in a crate sent all the way from texas, black-and-white spotted and her little girl tricia 6-year-old girl named him checkers. the kids love the dog and i want to say this right now there is this charlton heston among us all a regardless of what they say about it. that is of course the central thing that nixon talks about and what gets the name for the speech itself. nixon was very knowingly taking a line from fdr's famous speech and nixon thought it would be great to kind of like make the democrats mad by taking their great leaders onwards and flipping them around to defend himself in what nixon is doing throughout the speech is very clearly that he is divorcing the populist tradition which is rooted in the struggle in the late 19th century among small farmers, and trying to channel their hatred of banks and especially real estate people, who are kind of keeping the small guy down, keeping the small farmer in the state of b
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 12:00am EST
and incredibly radical document and there's a plebiscite in pennsylvania. the unionization in a sense of the militias is what gets a yes vote in some ways and then the constitution basically they say you know how we were talking about being radical place in the declaration? we will back that down a bit. the constitution is a different revolution and things go back and forth from there. >> we should open the floor to questions and you have written seven books. i have always found one of the most disappointing moments in my life is when i finished writing a book and i had to start over again and sometimes i don't have an idea of. what is the next bob sullivan book? 's we will be here for the next book reading. and i mean it. i'm a tremendous admirer and i think everyone of your books is a revelation. e.u. are so entertaining and learning at the same time in your extraordinary. >> i just read his books, i'm not kidding. i am trying to write a book and it's so depressing. it's so depressing. i can't begin to tell you. i'm trying to write a book and for 23 years i've been trying not to wri
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2012 9:00am EST
of the african union and similarly african led interventions for example in cÓte d'ivoire and somalia that provided a model for multilateral and regionally led solution to allow the united states and their allies to provide operational support without putting boots on the ground. this intervention will take time and stability cannot be restored through it military action. the situation in mali is as much a crisis of governance as of security. the long-running grievances in the north and a political vacuum in the south must be addressed through diplomacy, rebuilding democratic institutions and the restoration of democratically-elected government. in addition any agreement that attempts to -- a client with aqim well require the government to do so. elections are the key to not only resolving and restoring now frozen u.s. bilateral assistance but also for reclaiming government control of the north and restoring the three decade long history of history. political and security challenges cannot be addressed as separate issues. the international committee must work to address the small to
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 7:00am EST
. waters, schemers, drafters of the constitution gathering in albany, franklin's albany planet union. and so, so it went through the years. one of the great politicians of all time in this state come in this country, was the mayor of albany. he had an interrupted success from the time he was elected 1942 until he died in hospital in 1983, 11 terms uninterrupted, and that's the longest running mayor of any city in the united states, and he was very proud of that. he was part of this fantastic political machine, which took power away from the republicans in 1921. and a key figure in that was an irish dan o'connell, there were four oh connell brothers and a couple of corning brothers, his father was one of them. and they found the new democratic party and they took the city back from the republicans had run it since 1899. and when they took it in 1921, they never let go. it's still in power. succession has been on through the death of the two people who was the key, perpetuators of the machine. dan o'connell died in 1957, and erasmus six years later. and after that came tommy whelan who
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 10:00pm EST
. they kelley hessedal union are on fire, too. thanks again to yell and the fireball finally rang out. broderick started at the first observed black smoke curling upward. this indicated a fresh fire. from its color he got estimated temperature from experience new what a hot fire could do. breathlessly he dragged on his trousers, clapped his hat on his head and rushed out in his shirt sleeves. the instant he reached the square he began shouting. format rocket brigade. virtually in those days everything to the east of macomber street was underwater. gallbladder sludge between washington and clay streets which ran from the northwest and southeast sides of the square and was halfway to jackson pierced a few buckets were available to give her grade i.t. is canvas sacks, boxes in any container that holds water. broderick used his hat. so i try to keep this short. i personally love every part of this book. it's always a bit detailed. my drawing from which i'm proud of, we didn't use them all, i think you can probably see millions of lines in them. i'm pretty strict when i work. i make a mistake i do it
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2012 6:00am EST
and in september led a letter of 76 senators. and the european union to designate hezbollah for as a terrorist organization. the response was unacceptable in the sense that it laid out a series of bureaucratic reasons or hurdles that would have to be surmounted to do that. i don't think that should be acceptable to us when it comes to this terrorist organization. in the coming days, r.i. and senator lieberman and senator rich which will make a -- we will introduce a resolution with the same message that was sent to catherine afton. the grading the destructive power of iran and hezbollah is in the national security interests of the united states. assad is the key link between the two of them. efforts to support moderate forces opposing him within syria should be considered now and considered seriously. i have recently called for a more robust u.s. response to the crisis in syria. i believe a political transition to a government that reflects the will of the syrian people is also the core national security interests of the united states in the region. moreover this change would align with our va
CSPAN
Dec 4, 2012 11:00pm EST
parents in utah or any other state in our great union. article for this treaty obligates the united states to recognize economic, social and cultural entitlements is rights under domestic u.s. law. the senate is my opinion has not adequately investigated how the standard will affect domestic u.s. federal and state law. we have had one hearing on this issue that included both opponents and opponents of the treaty but did not substantively address my concerns about the standard, about the significant addition to what would become the law of the land of the united states of america. for these and other reasons, mr. president, he must oppose the u.n. convention on the rights of disabilities and encourage my colleagues to do the same. thank you mr. president. >> senator from massachusetts. >> i listen carefully to the senator and i understand colleagues on the other side of the aisle have concerns about the united nations and i respect that. we've had the space before, but i'm having difficulty finding where the threat gains any reality the senator has described specifically with respect to chi
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2012 12:00pm EST
contributing countries. european union, france, others have already begun to really engage with the malian forces, so it isn't as if there is an abstinence of support for them in the intervening period. >> what lessons have we learned, if i might, ms. dory and mr. gast, i think the mission just celebrated the 50th anniversary. we were actively engaged in the training a good thing as a part of the very probably democracy support and in trying to create and sustain a cultural democracy what lessons are there that we might learn going forward about political failures and more on domestic issues in the work rather abrupt requirement that we break off relations and support here has created a great difficulty with regional consequences. what lessons would you suggest we learn? the best of times mali is a country in crisis. it is a country that ranks of the model of a dozen. the assistant secretary carson mentioned 90% of the population is in the south and that population is also in the need of services. the government hasn't included both in the delivery of services as well as the governments of
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 1:00am EST
state in the union has at least one talking book library. the design, obviously, is to be sure that everywhere this idea of equal access to materials is fulfilled. in new york, the sort of point of entry to the talking book and braille library world is your local library. you can go into any public library, you can go into most school libraries, and even academic libraries in new york, and if you're in some way print disabled, and you need help being able to read print materials or hear or listen to print materials, those libraries make a connection to us, and we make arrangements for people to have improve access. the service's one that's insignificant transition. from books that used to be recorded pretty much on tape, the old cassette tape idea to using the latest in digital technology, and we're very excited about this transition because that makes it faster, cheaper, more efficient to get good quality reading materials to people when they need it. the service, obviously, is designed for the government to be sure that people have equal collections and access to the material
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 5:00pm EST
union. well, if you look at the history, it actually came very, very close a couple of times, particularly on three occasions. one was the cuban missile crisis . another time was actually less well-known, during the yom kippur war. but in the jerusalem post, a book written about this describing how the american and soviet navies were circling watching each other, get so tired, they almost made a mistake and pulled the nuclear trigger and each other. and finally, just sort of more innocent mistakes, if you look at an example in the 1980's, boris yeltsin, the president of russia, the norwegians had a zero weather rocket that they launched in the direction of russia. then notify the russians, but this time the notification got lost in the mail. the russian generals came and said, look, apparently somebody has lost something in us across our horizon. this is an american nuclear attack you have to miss the launch or russia will be obliterated with no shots back. thankfully was sober that date. relations were good between the u.s. and the soviet union. he said to me you know, it ca
CSPAN
Dec 4, 2012 8:00pm EST
out the rise of the soviet union and its intentions. president truman, my fellow missourian, and his staff glued together the containment strategy which stayed in effect through admiral -- excuse me, through general eisenhower's presidency and later until, as you know, the wall in berlin came tumbling down, and the soviet union imploded on itself. the strategy worked. after we get this solved, it's important that we glue together a national strategy. it's going to be different. there's not one single threat out there, but many. terrorism, force upon force, state against state challenges, and that's what we must do. and we must nurture those in the war colleges and in the state department who have that strategic vision, that ability to glue together a good strategy and make sure that it does come to pass. so i'm hopeful we can solve the problem, that the congress can come together as we did for many, many years in tough, tough, difficult choices. and if you watch the comedians from time to time, you will see larry the cable guy. and let me take a frame -- a phrase from him to the cong
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2012 6:00am EST
, the european union, have a weak presence, and, therefore, are not as relevant as they are in the balkans. ultimately this means that europe and the united states have less leverage in the region. this allows other countries in the region to compete or political, economic and military influence in the region. i'm looking for to hearing eyewitnesses discuss this issue today. really want to hear what you have to say. i believe that armenia, azerbaijan and georgia, trustworthy allies of the united states better realize full well that their bilateral relationships are complicated and that they have to take their immediate neighborhood into account also. with only two open borders and one of them being with iran, armenia faces the constant threat of isolation. this is a for driver in managing armenia's relationship with iran. azerbaijan has a sizable diaspora in northern iran, by vastly different strategic social and political orientation than iran's leaders. despite a potential religious incident between iran and trenton, iran has a stroke decided with armenia over the contested region. furth
CSPAN
Dec 11, 2012 6:00am EST
. >> i also thank her for 15 years, having union station, a true intermodal center, used to have people come to the greyhound station, drag their luggage to union station, we used to go around town to take a bus, and some satellite location and 15 months we have got that done and dedicated, came up for that during a very heated election but i thank you for your leadership. not this secretary but deputy secretary was instrumental in thanking the nation's capital having a true intermodal, like most of you. >> i want to thank our witnesses for being with us and i want to thank secretary ray lahood. it is your birthday. i would not have chosen to spend my birthday with you but glad you have chosen to spend your birthday with us. particularly to the chairman for holding this hearing and discussion -- a week and half ago to go to new york, bless amtrak forever, even on the assumption, and i do share your view, we have a densely populated corridor in the northeast, that requires no bust development of high-speed rail, and i don't think it should be at the exclusion of development of high-speed
CSPAN
Dec 12, 2012 12:00pm EST
to the former soviet union on multiple occasions to gain a better understanding of how the united states could secure and dismantle weapons of mass destruction. his experiences led him to champion the landmark legislation that successfully resulted in the deactivation of nuclear warheads, making this world a safer place. to date the nunn-lugar program has deactivated more than 7,500 warheads that were once aimed at the united states, a contribution to which americans can never give enough thanks. over his 36 years in this institution, senators from both sides of the aisle have considered dick lugar a trusted resource when it comes to foreign policy and many other important issues. he has been a consistent resource for those who seek thoughtful answers to difficult political questions. when i first arrived here in 1989, senator lugar and i operated a unique joint office arrangement in indiana, sharing office space and staff in our state. many of our colleagues were surprised by this arrangement, but dick lugar and i like to tell hoosiers they're getting twice the service for half the price. a
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 1:30pm EST
't be able to appreciate. they had this union, i suppose, where they circled each other, he observed her and she observed him. when she died at the age of 24 on april 17, 1680, immediately after her death her body was transfigured and there are a two witness accounts which were part of her cause, she has already passed away at 24 and a recluse and only had a couple female friends that knew her really well, and she started affecting substantial yours, women in childbirth and that sort of thing and would apply dirt to her grave for pieces of her clothing and burner garments and make tea out of it and drink it, these miracles kept up until about 1760 when the english took canada back or took canada from the french and everything ceased, the jesuits were exelled, they were really suppressed and came back in 1840s and in the 1840s discovered her, had some of the manuscripts out of the archives and rekindled this interest in her and she started affecting yours. the miracle that prompted the pope to canonize her, 2005-2006, a native american in the state of washington, playing basketball, hit h
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 1:00pm EST
or i wouldn't be able to appreciate. and they had this union, i suppose, where they sort of circled each other, and he observed her, and i think she observed him. when she died at the age of 24, it was april 17, 1680, immediately after her death her body was transfigured. and there are two written accounts which are in that book right there that was part of her cause over in rome. now, she's already passed away, and she was only 24 years old, and she was a recluse. she only had a couple of female friends that knew her really well but for the priests, and he started this curing, and she started affecting substantial cures. women in childbirth were having breach birth and that sort of thing, and he would apply dirt from her grave or pieces from her clothing, and they burned some of her garments and made a tea out of it, and people would drink it. and these miracles kept up until about 1760 when the english came in and took canada back or took canada from the french. and then everything ceased. the jesuits were expelled. i think some of them remained, but they were really, you you y, s
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 5:45pm EST
countries, and then he decides to go to kabul, where the soviet union has recently arrived, and it is there that you are born, 1982. >> uh-huh. >> so there's a -- i marked a little page here where your father writes to someone about his revolutionary arian rhode island. >> yes. >> we the pla are unique in many respects, official spokesman is a dog, wolf, and we have more commanders than fighters, first organization of pakistan's history that believes in fighting. we consider secrecy nothing to be secret about, and pla can make secrets more than friends, no one know exactly who is the chief. the official spokesman has ticks and likes to chew on borns. the official spokesman, well, undisciplined in personal habits. >> yes. >> so was that a true reflection of the character of his revolutionary activity? >> i think it was a reflection of the fact when they made the choice to confront the regime directly and militarily, they were 25 and 21 years old. they had, for two years, sacrificed their own lives, abandoned studies, my father gave up his post-graduate visitation in oxford t
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 10:45pm EST
black the courage to take on the school board committee teachers union, the academic elites, news media, entertainment culture. when we ceded ground which has crippled the country sandor standing and part of what we've done with alice sent in my case and writing novels to get across the american people as a country worth knowing and you know it by learning its history. he become an american. can claim genetic patterns, geographies. somalia, china, mexico. in calista's case, her parents came, her grandparents came from switzerland and poland and in my case from places like scotland and ireland. you can learn to be an american. to do that, you have to learn to be an american. do you have an academic elites and news media elite who were opposed to teaching how to be an american company literally cut off the lifeblood of this country. so that's the basis of what we've been doing and that's why we have an american legacy to her. .. and sense i've written three novels on george washington, what a better pattern than to weave these giants, ronald reagan, after whom the soviet empire disappeare
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2012 9:00am EST
with the european union. this shoulyou have two mature es trying to trade with each oampleother.the normal negotiatt labor and other things that sometimes takes so longs frankly shouldn't take long. mr. president, you spent a lot of tomb with our nato partners, and they'd be the same partners that would be our trading partners, if we'll move forward there. and finally, let me say, we need a fresh trade policy for the americas. we now have trade agreements with six countries that were part of the dominican republi republic/cafta agreement. and we have a trade preferences agreement with haiti, but we really need to look to see what we can do to trade in this hemisphere, improve our economic relationship with the south american giant country and giant economy of brazil. your best trading partners, mr. president, should be your neighbors. certainly canada and mexico have proved that. when we send canada $1, they traditionally send us back somewhere in the neighborhood of $1. right now it's about 91 cents. our trade with mexico -- mexico now sends us back -- or at least a year ago shall, and this number
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 8:30pm EST
, and those in union city, new jersey, who have, you know, electorally expressed themselves via the democratic party. that goes to who engaged them when they showed up, and cultivated their political activity and included them in the political activity that was going on at that time no those communities. there's a lot to be said in in cycle and going forward as part of a broader koa litionz, and one -- coalition, and one that i heard time and time again, and republicans love to go back to the reagan quote. the national polls this year should not give you comfort. it's, you know, two-thirds support for abortion, and 60% support for the affordable care act. the -- about 59% for same-sex marriage. this is among hispanics in the national exit poll. that doesn't sound socially conservative to me. >> no. >> and so also, the question, it becomes, and this is more for the people who -- i'm not a -- dangerous thing to say, but the hispanic millennials more like millennials or hispanic millennials like traditional hispanics exist? >> save that thought. dig peeper, and sorry to put you on the spot on thi
CSPAN
Dec 11, 2012 11:00pm EST
with the european union, african union could facilitate investment on piece nine rather than minerals that exist today. in order to expand the pie in the region for conflict resolution and development in which all people of the subregion can benefit, particularly at the center. the summit could focus on market-based opportunities for investment in congo in the region again. turns incentives away from illegal, extractive, violent binding to peaceful development that goes into the tax treasury incensed development in eastern congo. bob hormats undersecretary of state in the administration could be a kind of person who could help. not that estimate to build the alliances and both companies in the united states government and civil society trying to help promote responsible investment spurred on by 1502 from the dog frink law. conclusion, my bottom line is a credible internationally driven the root causes and includes eastern congolese civil society won't guarantee peace, but its absence, however, absolutely guarantees. thank you very much. >> mr. dizolele. >> chairman smith, ranking member bass, th
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 10:30am EST
-second interpretation is this. this radical document, the kind of unionization of the sense of malicious, in some ways, and then constitution. basically they say do you know how we were talking about the radical place, well, let's just cut that down a bit. the constitution is a different revolution. then things go back and forth from there. >> i think we should open the floor to questions, but they're still nearly 27 books. >> twenty-five. >> i've always found when the most disappointing moment in my life is when i finished writing a book and then i have to start all over again. let's all fix are counted so we will be here for the next the book reading. and i mean that. i have a tremendous admirer. i think everyone of your book -- books is -- you are learning at the same time. yourself extraordinary. >> so, i have tried to write a book. [inaudible] i'm trying to write a book about a guy i tried not -- for about 23 years tried not to write about them. seems kind of silly, but he is a photographer. [inaudible] >> i just realized, born in the fanny switches to see all that death. then he comes and he goe
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 2:00pm EST
environmental regulations to do with this curvaceous ms. much is your part to move to what is union wide environmental controls because it's moving across borders and the world really has to go to international standards to an answer to we have to develop the effective environmental controls at the international level that i needed to deal with these issues and provide a common theme for countries out there operating internationally. but she remembered the 300 largest corporations, 100 are still the best companies. so we are the center of the corporate world. glass lay on book that she mention, i don't think i'm quite as pessimistic if that's the right word. that things are much too bad for pessimism. [laughter] but it might come to this an area he described. i guess in some ways depiction and plea in my book is we could do better. we could be better people and we think we are sometimes and there's still a realistic possibility that we can rise to do the things they need to be done to move not only to deal with the current issues that we have now, but as steve hawkins said earlier, to ch
CSPAN
Dec 12, 2012 9:00am EST
our union, the importance of this law cannot be overstated. that's why the voting rights act enjoys a broad spectrum of support. in 2006, the senate voted unanimously 98-0 to reauthorize it, and just this year, the department of justice used its authority under section 5 of the voting rights act to object to new voter identification laws that threaten to disenfranchise hundreds of thousands of voters. in texas, according to the state's own data, more than 79 5,000 registered voters didn't have the i.d. required under their brand-new law. in south carolina, the states data kateed 240,000 registered voters were without the required i.d. and wouldn't be able to vote under the states law. in to states alone over a million people were going to be denied the right to vote even though they were registered voters because they didn't possess the newly defined voter i.d. in each of those states. that's more than one million registered voters -- i repeat -- that would have been turned away. thanks to the justice department and court decisions, that didn't happen. but it would have. that was th
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 2:45pm EST
segments of palestinian civil society including unions, all major political parties, human rights organizations and more. the growing global bds movement is a thriving, diverse and inclusive movement. it is strategic in nature, empowering groups around the world to choose targets and tactics that are appropriate within each particular context. it stands on three pillars; freedom, equality and justice. representing the three rights articulated in the call, the three minimal components to fulfilling palestinians' most fundamental rights. the movement has had tremendous success so far with victories announced weekly or sometimes daily from around the world growing in size and significance. most recently in the u.s., for example, the quaker friends fiduciary corporation which manages investments for more than 250 quaker institutions around the country decided to divest from caterpillar, violia and hewlett-packard. [applause] following concerns expressed by a palestine/israel action group. earlier this year msci delisted caterpillar from its list of socially-responsible investments pro
CSPAN
Dec 5, 2012 8:00pm EST
, guest worker part of it, there's going to be debate in the democratic party. there's unions not in favor of the guest worker program. they will have a party debate about these things. this will take awhile. there's no magic solution to this. i believe we can do it. >> what is the likelihood that congress passed, the president signed, some pathway to citizenship for current illegals? >> more than 50/50. i hope i'm not overly optimistic about it, but i believe that portions of reform can be dealt with quicker than others, but for the good of the country, we will have dealt with the issue and moved on. >> i brought an old friend. >> oh, yeah. >> from 2006 when you were florida's innovative ideas for florida's future, and one that i think you're talking about, the one you talk about, the promises we have to make to people is life without -- you said that you favored life without exception for sexual predators. you -- one of issues you talked about is human trafficking sexual exploitation of the chirch. why is the united states so slow to act on the issue? >> hard to believe we have a domesti
CSPAN
Dec 5, 2012 11:00pm EST
party. as labor unions i'm in favor of a guestworker program. they will have an internal party debates. there's no magic solution. it's important to do and i believe we can. >> last question on this for years from now we're sitting here. what is the likelihood that congress has passed and the president has signed? >> i think it's more than 50/50. i'm really optimistic about it, but i certainly believe portions of immigration reform can be done with quicker than others. my hope is for the good of this country. >> about a lot of old friend. this is from 2006 when you were florida official 100 innovative ideas for florida's teacher. a lot of these are still talking about, but one of the promises he said we should make to the people is life without -- you said you favorite life without exception or predators. you want the issues talked about his human trafficking, exploitation of children. why has the united states been so slow at the? >> is hard to believe we have a domestic problem. for us, human slavery is going somewhere else. it's hard to accept its right here. sex trafficking isn't h
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